The Global Warming Debate and Media Bias

Few topics have engendered as many claims and counterclaims of media bias as has global warming.* Certainly, there is much bias in the reporting of climate science and that is the main reason the average person is confused or misinformed. The issue of Climate Change and the Media was the subject of a 2006 Senate hearing of the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment & Public Works. It is a good place to start to examine the matter.

Media Bias generally refers to accusations of either censorship or propagandismon the part of particular news sources, where such content is framed in the light of a preconceived agenda. Relevant categories of bias include favoring a station’s corporate economic interests, having a political slant, or sensationalism that tends to distort news to make it a better commercial “product.”

The Hearing: The hearing was chaired by Senator Jim Inhofe (R-OK). In his opening statement, he accused the media of over-hyped reporting, of subverting its role as an objective source of information on climate change into the role of an advocate, and of hyping scientifically unfounded climate alarmism. Apparently no testimony was needed.

It was an interesting cast of characters who testified before the committee, two climate skeptics, a climatologist, a science historian, and an oil company lobbyist.Their testimony and the author’s short comment on each follow below:

Dr. R. M. Carter is a marine biologist and well known author from Australia. Dr. Carter testified that his research showed that throughout history, the rise in global temperatures had proceeded rising carbon dioxide concentration. His claimed that some natural cause must be causing the Earth’s temperature to rise, which released the carbon dioxide.

Comment: After the hearing, he was challenged by climatologists to produce any research showing the natural cause he claimed, but none has yet been produced. He also should have been aware that the recent CO2 increase has come from the billions of tons of fossils fuel burned each year by man. It is interesting that Senator Inhofe was concerned about the media bias in Australia.

Dr. Daniel Schrag is a climatologist from the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Harvard. He testified that there is no serious debate about whether the Earth will warm as carbon dioxide levels increase over this century – as it will. The burning of coal, oil and gas, and deforestation are playing a significant role in increasing CO2 levels. The current level, in excess of 380 parts per million (ppm), is higher than it has been for at least the last 650,000 years, and perhaps for tens of millions of years. We know from Lonnie Thompson’s work on tropical glaciers that this warming is not part of any natural cycle.

Comment: His testimony represents the accepted scientific viewpoint on global warming. Skeptics would claim there is still a serious debate, that the science is not settled, and that man is not the cause of global warming. His testimony contradicted that of Dr. Carter on natural causes and he quoted a source for his information.

Dr. David Deming is a geophysicist from Oklahoma University. He reported that his research on oil well borehole temperatures showed a warming of about one degree Celsius in North America over the last 100 to 150 years. He also claimed that the Earth’s temperature has not gone up in the last 10 years and that the Earth had entered a cooling period.

Comment: The one degree temperature rise he reports is consistent with NASA’s data but NASA’s data also shows that 1998 and 2005 have been record highs and that the trend is clearly upward. Dr. Deming is a controversial figure and he has been removed from most of his teaching duties at OU because of his unorthodox views.

Dr. Naomi Oreskes is a Professor of History and Science Studies at the University of California. She testified that in1983 the National Academy formed the Nierenberg committee to examine the scientific evidence of global warming. The committee accepted the scientific conclusions, but declined to view global warming as a problem, predicting that any adverse effects would be adequately remedied by technological innovation driven by market forces. This prediction has not come true as technological innovation has not saved the homes of the citizens of Shishmaref, Alaska, nor stopped the acidification of the world’s oceans, nor prevented the melting of polar ice.

Comment: The testimony was an accurate account of the history and points out some of the effects of global warming on the oceans and the lives of native Alaskans. The village of Shishmaref, inhabited for 400 years, is facing evacuation due to erosion from waves now allowed by the disappearance of year round sea ice, and by the thawing of coastal permafrost. Skeptics would claim that there is no global warming so there was no need for markets to respond, that the melting ice is natural, and the oceans are only more acidic by 0.1 pH unit. (Note: That is 20% more acidic.)

Dan Gainor is a Boone Pickens Free Market Fellow and Director of the Business & Media Institute (BMI). He testified that journalists claiming to provide the “truth” on climate change are criticizing America for its stance on the issue and on the Kyoto treaty, while ignoring the billions of dollars such an agreement would cost America. The media is obsessed with Al Gore’s film “An Inconvenient Truth.” Let’s recall the media’s irresponsible position, when roughly 30 years ago they reported a new ice age was coming and we would all freeze to death.

Comment: He claims journalists reporting global warming are unpatriotic and anti-business. Of course, BMI was formed to combat media bias against America’s free enterprise system and expose the anti-business agenda of environmental extremists. He is correct that some reporters sensationalized the “new ice age”, but after 30 years, he and others are still using the incident to discredit the press and science. His attack on Gore’s movie was unfounded. Interestingly, in 2007, Dr. Carter was the star witness for the plaintiff in Dimmock v Secretary of State for Education, who sought to prevent the educational use of An Inconvenient Truth in England. The court apparently did not agree with Dr. Carter and ruled that, though the film had some errors, it was substantially founded upon scientific research and fact and could be shown.

Was the hearing biased? It would seem balanced in that two of the four scientists who testified represented the scientific side and two were skeptics. However, it was actually heavily weighted toward the skeptic side. A CNN survey found that 97% of climatologists who are active in climate research say the Earth is warming and humans play a role, yet two of the four scientists who testified do not agree. Dr. Carter and Dr. Deming have research records in other fields that give them credibility as scientists but they are also journeymen for climate skepticism who can be counted on to deny global warming. Dr. R.M. Carter claimed the warming was from natural causes though he has not published or produced any research to back his claim, though asked. Dr. David Deming claimed the Earth warmed until 1998 and then entered a cooling trend. NASA’s data shows that 2005 was the warmest year on record so that is clearly not right.

Dan Gainor’s testimony was not balanced by an opposing view and there were not really any testimony from journalists. The witnesses might have included Eric Pooley, deputy editor of Bloomberg Businessweek, who thinks that the press misrepresented the economic debate over carbon cap and trade, failed to perform the basic service of making climate policy and its economic impact understandable to the reader, and allowed opponents of climate action to set the terms of the cost debate.

The purpose of the hearing was seemingly to discredit the journalists and the scientists who do not agree with Senator Inhofe’s views. In his opening statement, he named and criticized a number of journalists and news organization who had been critical of him or his views those those accused were not there to defend themselves. He claimed they were not accurately reporting the “hard science”, though his own beliefs are inconsistent with the “hard science” produced by scientific research. His stance on global warming, which he has stated many times is “Global warming is a hoax”.

Is the media biased? The “media” includes many sources, but overall the answer seems to be “Yes”. The media likes to sensationalize stories to attract attention and it often moves on without correcting the errors it commits. The story about the “Coming Ice Age” is an example. Few scientists believed that story at the time, but some editorial writers are still pointing to it as a failure of science. TV weather reporters often claim that a particular weather event is caused by global warming. That cannot be proven but it keeps the controversy stirred up and provides easy targets for skeptics. There is also a rush to be first with a story before the matter has been investigated as in the case of Climategate. After all the controversy, charges, and counter-charges, the investigations cleared the scientists of scientific misconduct. But, once a story is “out there”, it can never be taken back.

The media also has a general bias toward the status quo. It’s easy, it involves little risk to the newspaper, and it is fine with those who have a financial or political interest in continuing the status quo. In 1997, the Wall street Journal published an article titled “Science Has Spoken, Global Warming Is a Myth”. The article turned out to be a hoax but it came right before the Senate was to consider the Kyoto Treaty and may have influenced the Senate to reject ratification, thus maintaining the status quo.

The press also presents stories as controversies to catch readers interest. They sometimes try to present both sides, even though there is little evidence to support one side. This is certainly true in the case of global warming where all the world’s major scientific organizations have endorsed statements that global warming is occurring, that it is caused mainly by mans’ activities, and it is causing undesirable changes in the environment. Sometimes the press doesn’t even try to present both sides. Newspapers often report politician’s statements critical of climate science without balancing it with a scientist’s opinion. One example would be that many newspapers print Senator Inhofe’s famous statement “Global warming is a hoax.” but never point out that all four scientists at his hearing, even the skeptics, testified that the Earth was warming. Another point of view was presented at the hearings by another committee member, Senator James M. Jeffords (I-VT) who said” I can only say that I am sorry that I was not able to do more to change the minds of the few skeptics that remain in our nation. The climate is warming, it is due to human activity, and only a change in human behavior will ensure that my grandchildren will not suffer the consequences.”

Journalism Ethics: The solution to much of the bias would be for journalists and news media to follow the Ethical code of The Society of Professional Journalists, who believe that it is the ethical duty of the journalist to:

Seek Truth and Report It: Journalists should be honest, fair and courageous in gathering, reporting and interpreting information.

Act Independently; Journalists should be free of obligation to any interest other than the public’s right to know.

Be Accountable Journalists are accountable to their readers, listeners, viewers and each other.

It is a principle of professional ethics that anyone who practices the profession, whether a member of the organization or not, is bound by the code of ethics of the profession. In this case, the Journalist’s Ethical Code should apply to anyone who is involved in reporting the news.

(c) 2010 J.C. Moore



Satellite TV Troubleshooting And Finding The Signal

Anyone can mount a Satellite with no problem. Running the cable is also very straightforward to do. But, when it comes time to find a signal; that separates amateurs from the pros. I have always said, that finding the signal is not easy to do. But, it is simple. Why do I say that? Because, patience is what comes to place. Do you remember the old saying: Patience is a virtue. Well, finding the signal is a virtue.

I don’t care if you are a professional or not. The fact of the matter is: if you have right attitude approach towards concentrating in finding the signal, you will get it done. But, if you don’t…I will suggest you. Save your grief and hire someone to do if for you.

If you still want to try to find it for yourself, be my guest. But, before you try, here are some tips, you should consider.

1) Make sure you have a direct cable line from the dish to the receiver box. This is one of the most popular problems I seen so many times. When you are into finding the signal, you must eliminate any boosters, splitters or switches.

2) Get a clear line of sight. So many times, people are trying to find the signal when there is obstruction in the way. I will mention once: Satellite Signal Cannot go through trees, branches of anything solid blocking the way.

3) Use RG6 Coax Cable. If you want to avoid problems, it is strongly suggested to use the right type of cable. In this case, RG6 cable is what you need to use. Otherwise, the other type will deteriorate with time.

4) Check cable connectors. Connectors can be sensitive. If the connectors are corroded, you won’t get much signal. Or, maybe, they aren’t tight. Change then and crimp them properly. Last and not least, check for shorts: one of the aluminum filaments is touching the copper part. Thus, that creates a short. Subsequently, no signal will be shown on the TV screen.

If you follow these for basic steps, then you will find the signal always, whenever you are. And if you want to make it easier for you, get a signal finder. You can get either an analog or digital type.



The Impact of Communications – Marketing, Business, Behavior and Culture

In order to comprehend the impact of communication within your organization, members must understand that this particular element of your marketing mix is used to deliver advertising messages and assist target audiences and customers to make purchases. Communication builds a relationship with current loyal customers, while increasing brand awareness and convincing targeted consumers to buy your brand over your competitors.

There are many factors that can have a major impact on your organization’s communication strategy, but here are four key attributes:

1. Marketing

Companies create databases through many ways, such as surveys and transactions for mass customization. Mass customization means to take products traditionally designed for mass markets and reshape them to appear to be personally designed for your targeted customer. The structure of communication starts with the source, which gets the attention of the receiver or end-user, by stimulating their interest of your message. The receiver or end-user interprets the message provided by the sender, in order to provide feedback of the message.

2. Business

Through product and service quality, customer satisfaction is achieved through the creation of increased brand loyalty and elevated repeat purchases. With changes in the environmental factors affecting traditional advertising spending, marketing managers are seeking new and innovative media avenues to reach their current and targeted audiences. We are continuing to witness a shift from traditional media methods (TV, radio, newspaper and magazines) to strategic product placement (Internet commerce, mobile commerce and buzz marketing or viral marketing). As we examine two major categories of communication channels, we discover that they are either personal or non-personal. Personal communication channels involve direct communications through professionals, salespeople, by phone or through email communications. Non-personal channels include attributes such as TV, newspaper, radio, direct mail, Internet, etc.

3. Behavior

When communicating with your current or potential customer, you are building and maintaining a rapport for continued and future business. Cultural and environmental changes affect social, technological, political and economic performances. Physical responses to advertisements will stimulate a shopping environment. These responses are based on awareness, attention-knowledge, desire, conviction, action, price, purchase, evaluation presentation, innovation, information, decision-making and behavioral responses. Regional differentiation (national or global) will have an impact on population, the perceived value of your products or services by customers, need segmentation and cultural preferences.

4. Culture

When marketing and communication managers are promoting their products and services to current and targeted audiences, cultural values and elements of culture are taken into consideration, in order to analyze the impact of their purchasing decision process. Behavioral and demographic attributes consist of values, language, religion, attitudes, population, age, social organizations, education, technology and geography. A common and advantageous concept occurring among many small businesses and large corporations is cultural diversity. Embracing differences and variety within a company and among their target consumers, includes age, ethnicity, education, sexual orientation, race and gender. These attributes are a part of the company’s culture. Cultural diversity is becoming an integral part in most companies today and drives economic development, marketing, employee development, vendor relationships and consumer loyalty and spending.

Brand equity communicates the value and quality, or other aspects of your products or services. Communications help customers make more informed decisions about their purchases. Marketing, business, behavior and culture not only impact an organization’s communication, but they build relationships.



The Event Organiser`s Social Media Software Feature List

The Event Organiser`s Social Media Software Feature List

Admin/Configuration

Organisers have the ability to enable or disable every feature (listed below), subject to certain dependencies

Custom Branding

Custom CSS and HTML fields allow the event organiser to apply the look and feel of your organisation/event including logo, colour scheme, layout and more. Most text fields are customisable as well

Static Pages

For events that do not already use their own CMS (e.g. Drupal, WordPress, Radiant, etc.), we provide a simple static page module that event organisers can use to create their home page, hotel/travel page(s), sponsor pages (not fan pages) etc.

I18N

Event organisers can configure the appropriate date, time and currency formats for the

event’s locale. Note: at this time, system strings are not exported. However, event organisers may opt to enter text in other languages into the configurable text fields

Custom Subdomain Integration

Every event gets its own unique IP, so most events choose to use our recommended custom DNS settings to create sensible site URLs

Delegate Profiles

Every delegate gets an editable page with contact info, bio, profile picture, etc. Organisers can apply a default privacy level and then delegates can customise who can see their information (everybody, only people I follow, or nobody)

Social Networking

Delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can follow and be followed, which opens up the ability to swap contact information, send private messages and set up one-on-one meetings

Messaging

Delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can send public messages to a conference-wide messaging area, on specific event pages and on sponsor fan pages. They can also send public (@) replies and private/direct messages to people who are following them. Messaging is optionally) integrated with Twitter; however, people who don’t use Twitter can still use our messaging

Groups

Organisers can create an unlimited number of groups and organise them into categories.

Delegates and sponsor/exhibitors can join these groups to converse on various subtopics of interest at your organisation/event

Sponsor/Exhibitor Fanpages

Sponsors/Exhibitors can create fan pages to showcase their brands. Fan pages can include a logo, description, a single-question poll/survey, a “become a fan button” and (optionally) a “request meeting” button. Delegates can add comments on the fan page, become fans, answer the question and (if enabled), request private meetings with sponsors/exhibitors

One-on-one Meetings

If enabled, every delegate’s profile page and every sponsor/exhibitor’s fan page will carry

a “request meeting” button which will notify the recipient that the delegate is requesting

a meeting via email and give the recipient the option to accept or decline, adding the private meeting to both parties’ personal schedules, if appropriate

Contact Export

Delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can export detailed contact information for mutual followers and fans, respectively, to CSV (Excel)

Schedule Export

Delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can export their personal schedules to iCal, gCal, RSS and Outlook. This also allows offline synchronization with most smartphones

Branded Accounts

Sponsors/exhibitors are allowed to create “branded” accounts, e.g. The Pepsi User, which can give them an official voice with which they can communicate with the community

RSS

All types of public messages and personal schedules are available via RSS feeds that are “secret” in the sense that they contain a long, very-hard-to-guess hash in the URLs. However, delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can choose to share their RSS feeds with

other people or post them publicly

Organiser Support

Wewill assist the event organizer with site setup, branding and customisation up to the number of hours specified in the pricing schedule. Additional support can be purchased

Delegate Support

We do not provide front-line support to delegates; rather, we rely on the organiser’s help desk to provide Tier 1 support. Any issues with delegates or sponsors/exhibitors can be escalated to our “always on” Tier 2+ support, which supports a 24-hour turnaround SLA on any issue

Full Schedule

Delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can browse (and search) the entire event schedule of

keynotes, breakouts, parties and other gatherings. Day-by-day listings, A-Z listings and a graphical grid view are available. All views clearly indicate which events delegates are attending and show mosaics of friends attending and, optionally, all people attending

Personal Schedule

Delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can add an unlimited number of sub-events to their

own personal schedules, which they can then choose to share with everybody, people they follow or nobody. Personal schedules can also be posted to various social sites, e.g. Facebook and Twitter and sync’d with most desktop and online calendaring software and smartphones.

Schedule Notifications

The system will send schedule update and change notifications to delegates (only those

who have opted-in) if events they have added to their personal schedules

Social Notifications

The system will send “you’ve been followed” type messages to delegates and sponsors/

exhibitors (social notifications) to those who have opted-in to this feature

Friend Sync

Delegates and sponsors/exhibitors can click buttons to easily import their existing friends from Facebook, Twitter and (soon) LinkedIn who are also attending the event

Cross-posting to Social Sites

Embedded AddThis widgets allow delegates and sponsors/exhibitors to share various

parts of their conference experience (event-specific comments, public messages, personal schedules, etc.) with hundreds of different social sites, e.g. Facebook and Twitter

Content Aggregation

For a richer site experience and better SEO, We poll the web, Twitter, Flickr and YouTube for content relevant to the event and post outbound links to this content along with summary information on the event site, similar to the way trackback pings work on many popular blogging platforms

Crowdsourcing (via Crowd Campaign)

Purchasing grants event organisers a free enterprise-level license to create a single Crowd Campaign. This allows the organiser to create and manage a Twitter-powered contest of any nature. Examples include opening a conference call for speakers, soliciting questions for popular keynote speakers or even suggesting what food or speciality drink to serve at the opening night party

Site-wide Search

Most of the site’s content is indexed into a fast and scalable search engine, allowing

delegates and sponsors/exhibitors to enter free-form queries and get back results categorised into people/events/venues/messages/fan pages

Site Analytics

We offer built-in integration with Google Analytics for overall site traffic and page-specific metrics. Event organisers also have access to a rich site analytics console that shows exactly how various features of the platform were used, e.g. average number of friends per delegate, average number of fans per sponsor, total message counts (private and public), average number of events added to personal schedules

Sub-event Capacity Planning

Event organisers have access to a reporting tool that shows how many people are attending each breakout session, party, etc. Targeted messages can be sent to all delegates of a given sub-event, e.g. “Breakout A has been moved to Room 101 to accommodate the large delegate list” or “Overflow Room 202 has been added for Keynote B.”

Profile and Schedule Callback APIs

We optionally provide two “callback” mechanisms to make sure that delegate data stays in-sync with the organisation’s system of record for personal and schedule data, if such a system is in use. For example, if a delegate updates his or her profile, the changes are posted back to a configurable URL to allow those updates to propagate back into the appropriate system of record. Similarly, each time an event is added or removed to an delegate’s or sponsor/exhibitor’s personal schedule, we post this action to a configurable URL. This allows an external system of record to track breakout attendance for capacity planning purposes or other reasons

Mass Email

Event organisers can send mass emails to the entire community or to selective subsections. Email templates can be customised in “mail-merge” fashion

Public and Private RESTful APIs

Event organisers have access to dozens of different public and private (login required)

APIs to allow external applications to automate the platform. Some examples are running searches, getting lists of friends, getting and modifying personal schedules, adding and removing friends, etc. For a complete list, visit http:// <your_conference_site_url>/api (admin account access required)

Mobile Web

Most of the features described above are available on a generic mobile web UI that is tuned to look best on iPhone and Andriod handsets, but that also works well on Blackberry, Palm and Windows Mobile. This part of the site is included even if the event organiser opts NOT to purchase mobile app integration

Mobile Application Integration

Via a partnership with mobile application provider DUB, we offer a full-featured native application for the iPhone and iPod touch that includes, among many other features, very fast offline access to the complete event schedule and personal schedules. When the handset comes back online, schedule updates and changes are two way sync’d back with the conference web site. Note: applications for other platforms,starting with Blackberry and Andriod, are due out in late 2010

QR Codes

Our platform includes hooks into various endpoints that can easily be integrated with QR Codes. Some examples include automatic following when snapping pictures of QR codes on delegates’ badges, lead generation by sponsors/exhibitors and even breakout event “check-in” by delegates

Registration Integration

Integrate with REGIS online delegate management software via a simple RESTful web service API. Delegates can also be forced to create their own accounts if registration integration is disabled

http://event-master.com & http://blog.event-master.com



No Animals Were Harmed – All About Animal Actors

ANIMAL ACTORS: Interview with Sandi Buck, American Humane, Certified Animal Safety Representative

Q: What is the American Humane Film & TV Unit?

A: American Humane (AH) Film & TV Unit is based in Los Angeles and we monitor the use of animals in media. American Humane is a national organization with headquarters based in Denver, Colorado. I’m one of the Certified Animal Safety Representatives who go on set and monitor the use of animals in film and television. We award the “No Animals Were Harmed® in the Making of this Movie” disclaimer seen at the end of the credits in a movie.

Q: How did the American Film & TV Unit start?

A: Back in 1926, AH set up a committee to investigate abuses of animals in the movie industry. At that time, horses were the most at-risk animal actors. But, then, as now, animals have no inherent legal rights, so we couldn’t mandate the safety of the animal actors. In 1939, for the film “Jesse James,” a horse and rider were sent hurling over a 70-foot cliff into a raging river for an action shot. The stuntman was fine, but the horse’s back was broken in the fall and it died. Outrage over this sparked a new relationship between AH and some motion picture directors and producers and caused the Hays Office to include humane treatment of animals in the Motion Picture Code. The following year, AH received authorization to monitor the production of movies using animals. We worked on set for quite a while after that until the Hays Office was disbanded in 1966, ending our jurisdiction and excluding us from sets. This was a pretty dismal time for animal actors who were being used in some brutal ways. Then, in the early 1980s, another incident caused another public outcry and American Humane was added to the agreement with SAG that mandated that union films contact us if they were using animals. This agreement now includes any filmed media form, including television, commercials, direct-to-video projects, and music videos. A more detailed history is on our website. Right now, we monitor about 900 films a year, maybe more. That’s not counting commercials.

Q: Did you say animal actors no have legal rights?

A: That’s correct. Animals have no “legal” rights in the sense that humans have. But because of our SAG agreement, animal actors in SAG films have “contractual” rights because the AH office must be contacted by productions using animals and an AH Film & TV Unit representative be on set during the filming.

Q: What about nonunion productions?

A: Nonunion productions are not contractually bound to contact us, but we find that a lot of people want us there anyway. I’ve worked with several productions that say – “We want you here. We want that rating at the end of our film and we want people to know what we had you on set.”

Q: So people on set are happy to see you?

A: Generally yes, but sometimes no. Actors always love seeing us there. They look at the AH patches on my jacket and come up to me constantly on set and say – “Oh, you’re here for the animals. That’s so great, I’m so happy you’re here.” That’s what we want. We want people to look for us, to know we’re there, and why we’re there. As for production, it depends on their perception of us and if they’ve worked with us in the past. People we’ve worked with before love having us there. The ones who haven’t worked with us before sometimes think “oh, no, here comes the animal police to patrol us,” like I’m going to stand there with my hands on my hips telling them what they can and can’t do. It’s not like that. We’re not there to criticize. We’re there to work with filmmakers, not against them. If we see a problem, we’ll address it and work it out together. In Florida, for instance, one of the big concerns is heat. During one production, the producer wanted a dog to walk back and forth across the pavement. I told the director there was a problem with this. I already knew he didn’t like having me on set, but I told him anyway, “You take off your shoes and walk across that street.” He went out to the street, put his hand on the pavement, and said – “Yeah, you’re right.” He wasn’t trying to harm the animal, he just wasn’t thinking about the animal, the heat, and the pavement. That’s part of the reason we’re on set. We don’t expect filmmakers to also be animal experts. Even producers who personally don’t care about animals usually realize it makes sense for them to have us there. Many people say they won’t watch a movie in which they think or have heard that an animal was injured or killed. People look for the AH disclaimer at the end of movies saying – “No Animals Were Harmed® in the Making of this Film.”

Q: How do filmmakers get a “No Harm” disclaimer for their movies?

A: The process starts when production contacts our Los Angeles office to let us know that they plan to use animals. We direct them to our Guidelines which are available on the internet and we request their script. We review the script and arrange to come in and observe the animal action to ensure that the conditions in which the animals are working and kept is safe and comfortable. This doesn’t cost the union production anything – that’s part of the arrangement with the SAG office.

Q: What about nonunion productions? Can they get this “No Animals were Harmed®” disclaimer?

A: The process to get the disclaimer is the same, only there’s a $30 an hour fee for the hours we’re on set. The time we spend in pre-production script evaluation and then screening the films and writing up reviews is included in that $30 an hour on set fee.

Q: Can student and independent filmmakers get your disclaimer?

A: Definitely, if they meet the guidelines for it. If they have questions, all they need to do is call our LA office and ask. Our LA office is happy to help young and aspiring filmmakers with guidance and information on safely using animals in their films. If they’re in the process of writing a script, they can call us and ask if certain scenes are feasible and for advice on how to get the scenes and action they want. Productions who can’t get an AH representative on set because of cost or scheduling conflicts can write down what it is they plan to do, document the filming of the animal action with a little video, a behind the scenes – this is how we did it, kind of thing – and send it in. We review it and though we can’t say we were actually there, we can say that through our review, it looks like the production followed the Guidelines. That rating is called: “Not Monitored: Production Compliant.”

Q: How many ratings are there?

A: We have several ratings which range from our highest “Monitored: Outstanding” and receiving the “No Animals Were Harmed”® disclaimer which appears in the end credits of the film, to “Not Monitored,” to our lowest rating which is “Monitored Unacceptable” – where our guidelines and animal safety were disregarded and or negligence caused the injury or death of an animal. Striving for a good rating helps ensure that the production will go well. If a production is half way through shooting and an animal that is key to the movie gets spooked and gets loose or injured, it’s like losing a lead human actor. What’s the producer going to do? Re-shoot the animal scenes with another animal actor? Rewrite the script? Scrap the movie? Professional trainers have several different dogs with different talents that look alike. One’s a really good barking dog, one’s a really good jumping dog, another does something else. That helps in the event one dog gets sick or injured, it won’t halt filming. A lot of the worst scenarios can be avoided with planning. I look for potential problems and to keep everything as safe as possible for everyone. There can always be accidents, there’s no way to prevent that. That happens in life. You can work to make things as safe as possible, but there can still be accidents. We understand that. The bottom line is at that any time filmmakers plan to use animals, even their own pets, they should contact our LA office.

Whether or not one of us comes out to your set, they should refer to our Guidelines For the Safe Use of Animals in Filmed Media so they know what they need to prepare for, to say to themselves – this is what I need to prepare for if I’m going to use an animal on my production. Am I prepared to do what I need to do to make sure that everything is safe for my animal? Having us involved benefits the production in that if there’s ever any question as to how a stunt was done the filmmaker can say – call AH. Filmmakers with the reputation of abusing animals for the sake of producing a film or commercial won’t get hired and people won’t want to watch their movies. We are the only organization authorized to make and uphold these standards and people look for it. When people see animals in films, they look to see that no animals were harmed. If they have any questions on how things were done, they can go to our website and read about it. They can see that this stunt that looks absolutely horrible was actually done with computer graphics, a real animal wasn’t even involved.

Q: Are personal pets allowed to be in movies?

A: Our Guidelines recommend that filmmakers use professional animal actors obtained through trainers, but we know that filmmakers, especially small independent and student filmmakers are going to use their own pets or the pets of friends and family in their movies. We understand that, that’s a reality in this business. But even if it’s no more than filming their own pet cat or dog sitting in a chair or walking across the room, filmmakers should get in the habit of contacting our office. When producers choose dogs, for instance, they should look for dogs with outgoing personalities, dogs that aren’t afraid of people. Fear can cause a disaster. The dog can bite someone out of fear if they get in a situation in which they’re not comfortable. If more than one dog is to be used on set, the dogs should be used to being around other dogs. If one dog shows aggression toward another dog on set, the aggressive dog must be removed. Dogs that live together and are accustomed to being with each other are good choices.

Q: You mentioned education as being part of the goal of AH. Would you talk some about that?

A: We’d like to work more with film schools developing programs where as part of the curriculum, students take a course or attend a seminar held by an AH representative about using animals in film. If the school can’t put us into their program yet, just having our Guidelines available at the school or distributed to students will help educate them. The earlier we reach the students, the better. These filmmakers will grow in their careers and will eventually be involved in large productions where they might end up working on films with large animals. That’s the point where you really worry about safety, so the earlier we can educate students, the better.

Q: What can you advise students or aspiring filmmakers wanting to use pets? Your Guidelines can look daunting.

A: If filmmakers choose to use a pet instead of trained animal, we have no control over that but we still recommend they review and adhere to our Guidelines. If the Guidelines seem overwhelming, call our LA office with questions, say – “All I want is for my dog to sit in a chair or walk across the room while we’re doing our filming, what are the guidelines?” Most of it is just common sense. Know that the animal you’re using is friendly and completely safe to be around people and other animals. You don’t want an animal on set that’s aggressive, skittish, or snaps. Think about what you’re going to do with this animal while you’re setting up shots. How many times do you actually need the real animal? Can you use a stuffed animal if there’s any concern about using a real animal? You don’t want a real dog sitting under hot lights while you’re setting up. Go to a toy store and get a stuffie look-alike of whatever animal you’re using. Make sure the animal won’t be in the way of a moving dolly and that she won’t be in area in which she can get stepped on. When she’s not being used on set have a suitable place for her to hang out, that she’s not running around loose. There needs to be a safe area like a crate or separate room for the animal. Make sure the pet has breaks and gets to lie down and rest or get something to eat and drink. If the pet isn’t kept in a crate, make sure it’s on a harness or leash so that should she get spooked by a loud noise or quick movement, she can’t jump down and run away. Plan ahead and prepare for all possible scenarios. That’s critical. If an animal won’t do what you want, what are your options? Have back up plans. How far should you go to try to get an animal to do something? If the animal won’t or can’t do what you want him to do, forcing him is inviting disaster. Even if the animal normally does something, an animal is an animal. You can never predict what it’s going to do or not do. It’s like working with a child. The producer has to be prepared.

Q: Who is responsible for the safety of a pet during filming?

A: The ultimate responsibility lies with the owners as they will suffer the anguish and grief if something happens to their pet. I recommend that pets not be passed around to people on set to play with. That can be overstimulating to animals, and if they’re all excited, they may not be able to perform the action you want them to perform. Many trainers make a general announcement on set – don’t touch animals while they’re working. Obviously, with the exotics, people are pretty good about asking before touching them but a lot of times, with dogs and cats, people just walk up and pet them without asking.

Q: Does AH have a problem with certain action shots?

A: If filmmakers wonder if a certain action shot can be obtained safely, call and ask us. If a filmmaker wants a dog to run off the end of the dock and jump into a lake to get an exciting shot, they should make the obvious choice. Pick a Labrador Retriever who loves to swim and run and jump off the dock and has actually practiced this. They shouldn’t choose a little Chihuahua that’s never been in the water.

Q: How did you get into the field?

A: I grew up in Michigan in a very animal-oriented family. We had the house with the invisible sucker sign hanging on the front of it – animals could see the sign, but we couldn’t. Animals constantly showed up at our door and people dumped their puppies and kittens off in our barn. We had dogs, cats, horses, guinea pigs, and hamsters, and just about everything else. As a teenager, I raised and trained a working Seeing Eye dog. After that, I raised a wonderful Doberman for obedience. After college, I tried a few careers, but didn’t really care for any of them. In the early 1990s, I moved to Key West, Florida. That was about the time the series “Key West” with Fisher Stevens and Jennifer Tilly was being filmed as a pilot. I accidentally met the medic on set and we started talking. He learned that I was a dive master with dive master medical training and said they’d been looking for someone else to work on set when they went to series. He asked if I was interested and I was. So, I went and got EMT certification and worked on that series as the medic when the other medic wasn’t available. After the series ended, I worked fulltime as an EMT paramedic and part time as paramedic in film. I also volunteered with my dog in the education department at the Humane Society of Broward County. We went around to schools and taught pet education to the kids. Through that, I began working as a surgical assistant for the shelter. I was basically done the same things for animals that I was doing for humans. It was hard working for the shelter, for obvious reasons, but it was also very rewarding and I loved it. One day I was watching a movie through the credits and saw the “No Animals Were Harmed® in the Making of this Film” disclaimer and that a representative was on set to monitor all animal action. A light went off in my head – “Hey, that’s a job. If somebody was on set that means it’s an actual job.” I sent my resume to the recruiting office in LA and got an interview. My background with horses and dogs, and dog training, and medical and film experience worked well together for the position. I then went through the AH training which basically teaches film and set etiquette, which I already knew from my experience on set, and learning report writing and the Guidelines. Right now, I live in Virginia. As my husband is in the military, we move around a bit, but as my job requires a lot of travel, I can do it from wherever we’re based. Though most of my work is in this area, I’ve traveled all over the country. I’ve been to Mexico, Canada, Wyoming.

Q: What films have you worked on locally?

A: Susan Jackson, our representative based in Richmond, and I have worked independently and, in the case of large films such as “Dreamer,” we’ve worked together. During the filming of “Dreamer,” producers wanted something that looked like ointment to slather on an animal and they didn’t know what to use. Susan suggested a solution of milk and water. So they mixed the milk and water and said – “oh, that’s looks really good.” Another instance on “Dreamer” was a barn scene. The crew needed the barn cats out before they could start filming. Susan came up with and organized a plan to catch the cats and send them off to be spayed and neutered. By the time filming was done, the cats could come back. It helped everybody. These are simple solutions that have helped producers get the scenes they want. We don’t expect filmmakers to be animal experts; that’s why we’re there. We’ve been in this business a long time and have a lot of training behind us. A lot can be done with camera tricks, computer graphics, stuffie stunt and photo doubles and some creative solutions. Most recently I was one of the Safety Reps on “Evan Almighty.” “Birds and Animals,” a huge animal company for the film business supplied the animal talent. They have offices in Florida, California, New York, overseas and have all kinds of animals and I’ve worked with them for years since I started at AH seven years ago. They’re great to work with and have excellent trainers who very concerned about the safety and welfare of their animals. Another huge part of our job is perception. It’s often the perception of actors who aren’t familiar with animal training. For example, when I was on “Evan Almighty” there was a scene with all these different small animals. One way to lure small animals like skunks, rats, and porcupines from point A to point B is with a buzzer. These little animals can’t be trained to come like dog or even a cat. These little animals are taught that when they walk across the room to the buzzer, they get a food reward. One of the actors watching this came over and asked – “Are these animals being shocked?” I said, no, and explained the whole buzzer thing. Without someone like myself being there to ask, this actor could have walked off set thinking that the animals on set were being shocked. It was amazing to watch the whole process on “Evan Almighty.” A huge ark was built in Charlottesville, VA, and they had a special camera that exactly replicated every single move of the animals. Animal were brought in one at a time, so if there were forty animals in a scene, they did that take forty different times at least, each time with each different animal. Sometimes there were pairs of animals, sometimes there was only one – the same animal walked across the room twice. It was all put together by computer to look like all these pairs of animals were in the same room, even though they weren’t. That was a lot of fun to work on.

I also do the “Puppy Bowl” in Silver Spring, Maryland, at the Discovery Channel which airs on the Animal Planet at the same time as the Super Bowl. A little stage is built that looks like a football field and puppies go out there and play. They have “Kitty Half Time” and a “Tail Gate Party” for the dogs that didn’t get into the game. It’s hilarious. Initially, they were a little wary of me, but now we have a great relationship. It’s nice when you walk off the set and the people you met when you first came in were looking at you like – “here she comes,” then say – “thank you so much for being here, we want you back next year.”

American Humane was founded in 1877. It is the oldest national organization dedicated to protecting both children and animals. Through a network of child and animal protection agencies and individuals, the American Humane Association develops policies, legislation, curricula and training programs to protect children and animals from abuse, neglect and exploitation. The nonprofit membership organization, headquartered in Denver, raises awareness about The Link® between animal abuse and other forms of violence, as well as the benefits derived from the human-animal bond. American Humane’s regional office in Los Angeles is the authority behind the “No Animals Were Harmed”® End Credit Disclaimer on film and TV productions, and American Humane’s office in Washington is an advocate for child and animal protection at the federal and state levels. American Humane is endorsed by the Better Business Bureau’s Wise Giving Alliance and has been awarded the Independent Charities Seal of Excellence.

Animal actor “Angus,” Actor Ken Kline’s black Labrador Retriever was cast as “Dog with Man” in “Capitol Law,” an ABC Pilot filmed in Washington, D.C., and also on “Shooter” as a quadedestrian in Baltimore’s Federal Hill. Ken met American Humane Film & TV Unit representative Sandi Buck on the set of “Evan Almighty” in Richmond, Virginia, where she was overseeing the use of wild animals like bears, wolves, and mountain lions on set. Angus decided stay to home for that particular film.



How to Build Your Business With Radio, TV, and Print Interviews

One fast and easy business building strategy for solo professionals is to get interviewed on radio, the Internet, television, and in print media. It’s easier than ever to catch a request for an interview, what with YouTube, BlogTalk Radio, and Internet TV channels. With Webcam and VOIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) technologies, you might well get the chance to be on radio or TV anywhere in the world without leaving your office. This series of articles will cover everything you need to know to deliver an interview with ease and in a way that will make you welcome on shows and in print media, too. I’ll show you the five key steps of pro interviewing, along with these tips:

1) How you can “drive” the interview in a direction you want to go

2) What the people interviewing you REALLY want from you

3) How to create marketing opportunities right in the interview

4) How to recycle your interviews to build more presence for your business.

First, though, let’s talk about where giving interviews fits into your business. A successful entrepreneur has three things going that ensure business success. These components are a solid business plan with financial projections that take you where you want to go, a creative and low-cost marketing strategy for the business, and a willingness to remove any personal blocks that keep the business from succeeding. Each component is equally important to your business.

Interviewing is a part of your business’s marketing strategy. If you are unsure or resistant to thinking about interviewing as a way to showcase your expertise and experience, you more than likely have inner blocks that are in your way. Working to change that is a part of personal growth. For solo professionals who decide to do it, interviewing can be easy, fun, and help you build your business.

Before you begin to accept interview opportunities, you’ll need to put together a simple media kit or media page on your website. As a beginning, this should include:

1) A head shot of you (both black & white and color) that can be downloaded from your website or sent as a.jpg file in an e-mail

2) A brief (250 words) bio about you and what you do

3) A list of topics you can speak about

4) A list of your speaking and media experience (if you have any).

Pulling together this simple media kit will allow you to quickly respond to a request for an interview. You can refer the person to the media page on your website, or e-mail the information quickly.

There are five key steps to interviewing like a pro. Here they are, in the order you will probably use.

1) Know your goal.

2) Pick gigs based on your goal.

3) Prep the call.

4) Answer questions briefly but strategically.

5) Follow up diligently.

If you follow each step, you’ll find yourself quickly and easily handing interviews and benefiting from them in more ways than one. Each step helps ensure that your interview will be of benefit to the person interviewing you and to your business. Any time a solo professional can take an action that has a double benefit, it’s sure to be a winner!

Know Your Goal

Just as with anything else you do in business, being interviewed takes your time away from other things you could be doing. You won’t be getting paid, but you still do want a return on your investment of time and sharing of your expertise. Setting a goal for each interview you decide to give will help you get a return.

Ask yourself why you want to do this particular interview, and what you would like to get out of it. There are at least five ways to benefit, and you can probably hit two of them with each interview. The first goal is to build visibility for your business. Think about where and how much the interview will be publicized, the likely size of the listeners or audience, and how much introduction you are likely to receive.

Gaining credibility is a second goal. No one is going to ask you to be interviewed if they think you have nothing of value to offer their listeners or audience. Just by doing the interview, you gain credibility. It’s a good idea to keep a list of all the places you’ve done interviews, and add this to your media page. Reporters and others who are always looking for guests will be impressed that you’ve interviews and will be grateful to find someone who knows the ropes. Just like many other things in the business world, doing interviews can create its own energy. Word spreads that you are both interesting and willing, and you will get more opportunities once you break the ice.

A third goal for doing interviews is to build your list of prospects. Especially if you are an Internet-based business (or have an Internet-based component to your business) constantly building your list is a key concern for you. For Internet businesses, a list of potential customers is the goose that lays the golden egg. For businesses that are not Internet-based, their database of contacts and prospects is also important.

How does interviewing help you build your list? Many times, the person interviewing you will require people who want to listen in on the call or radio show to register ahead of time, even if the call is free. The interviewer may be building his own list using this strategy. He may need to know roughly how many people to expect on a telephone interview so that he can reserve enough phone lines through his conference call provider. He may want to collect information about the industry his listeners are coming from. Whatever the reason, there is often an opportunity to share this information and build your own list, too. If you do this, make sure that when a prospect registers for the event she is told that registering means she will receive the call-in access information and that she will receive a free subscription to your own electronic newsletter (e-zine). Make sure that you operate within the Federal laws regarding e-mails and SPAM.

Even if the person interviewing you doesn’t require a registration to listen in on the event, you can still build your list right on the call. Your bio should include information about your website’s URL. Include a statement something like, “Be sure to go to my website and subscribe to my e-zine, for you’ll receive valuable marketing tips several times a month.”

Product development is the fourth goal you can meet by doing interviews. Once the interview is done, there will likely be a recording of it. Viola! You have a product, a half-hour or hour-long interview about a particular topic that you can give away as an MP3 file, burn to a CD and sell, or have transcribed and make part of a product bundle. Interviewing is a quick and easy way to build up a library of low-cost products that can create a passive income stream for you. Agree ahead of time that you will get to share the audio file of the interview with the person who interviews you. The majority of times, this is understood at the outset – that both of you can use that resource in any way you want. Having the file is useful, for you can create audio clips from it to use in advertising or presentations along with using it as a product to give away or sell.

Finally, you may have a goal to make a special offer to the audience during an interview. Most hosts will be more than willing to take a brief time during the interview to let you offer something special to their listeners. This helps the host become known as someone who offers special deals or surprises, which in turn builds their audience. For you, it can be a way to test out a new product or service with an audience, or to raise some quick cash by offering one of your services with a special add-on for the same price. To make special offers effective, limit the time it is available (usually that day or 24 hours only) and/or the quantity offered. Build a special link in your website for this special offer, and announce it on the call, leading the audience to browse to your website, purchase the offer, and perhaps browse the rest of your website, too.

My next article will explore more of the five key steps to interviewing like a pro. Stay tuned!

(c) Sue Painter



Online Product Promotion

Promotion of a product plays vital role in Marketing Management. Companies can run same advertisement and promotion campaign side by side, in home market or change them for each local market.

The use of media for promotion also requires international adaptation because availability varies from country to country. Basically all the advertisement features the same single image. Magazines, TV, and internet plays major role for promotion of a product. But all of them vary in availability and effectiveness. For example newspaper has a national reach in UK but advertiser can only buy local coverage in most of countries.

In my opinion, internet will not become a major advertising medium like radio,TV,and print media, as internet users are more interested in its other uses ,yet advertising appear on screen. Reason can be a company has to decide which media will be cost effective for promotion of product. Popular portals such as MSN and yahoo are able to charge large fees due to huge audience.

Banner ads containing text and may be a picture are most extensively used promotion tool.

Micro sites are relevant for companies selling low interested products, such as insurance. People rarely visit an insurance company website.

Interstitials are advertisement that pops up between changes on website.

Sponsorships are best placed in well targeted sites where one can offer relevant information or service.

Companies can set up alliances and affiliate program where one internet company works with another one .Companies can offer to print content and adds to targeted audience who want to receive them. Ads reach to audience who are really interested in product. Costs are also reasonable compared with other advertising media.

Promotion being the important part of 5 Ps should be considered at optimum level for product marketing and media should be selected with all factors in mind.



Regulatory Challenges and the Media

There is definitely a culture clash in the world, and I’m not talking about the Western World and the Middle East, rather I’m talking about in the media such as television, radio, and newspapers and the new paradigm of social media, the Internet, and all the combination variations in between. Not only that, we also note that there have been lots of regulatory changes propping up the old, and preventing the new from making headway. Let’s go ahead and talk about this for a moment if we shall.

You see, the Internet is rising so quickly along with e-commerce, and social networks that the media can’t keep up. In fact the old media is trying to find new ways to use social networks and the Internet to blend the content so they don’t lose the next generation of readers, and can keep from losing current subscribers who are migrating to electronic formats for their intake of news. Consider if you will all the apps on the iPad for all the major news outlets, and all of the industry association trade journals.

The old media is also very upset because it is being plagiarized at such a high rate that as soon as the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, or any other publication puts out an article, that article is copied, or parts of it are copied and syndicated across the Internet within minutes, and redistributed to the whole world. Those that are consolidators or syndicators of news often make quite a bit of money off their advertising on their websites, but the old media still has to pay to create the content. Obviously it’s easy to make a lot of money grabbing other company’s work when all there is; is revenue, and someone else is generating all of the articles, videos, and news.

You can see how upsetting this is – especially considering that the new media is competing with the old media, and the old media is paying for all the content that the new media is stealing. Because of this we are noticing new regulatory challenges in the online venues. This culture clash, of the new versus the old will continue. It appears that everyone in the new media believes that all the information should be free. But the old media is trying to stand on the integrity of the reporting, often flying reporters halfway around the world doing stories in places off the beaten path.

If they are not paying for that content, they can no longer send the actual reporter there to collect the information first hand. Further if they collect the information through social media, tweets, and cell phone videos of people who are actually there, then obviously the news will be jaded, and favoring the opinions of those taking the pictures. This might seem like an okay thing, because we are getting information in real time, but we aren’t necessarily getting nonbiased news.

Government regulations to try to protect the old media aren’t working, attempts to shut off ISPs of those who allow the posting of plagiarized information isn’t going to fly with Internet users, and it’s a bad idea anyway. Nevertheless, you can expect these controversies to continue throughout 2012 and more regulations to come. Please consider all this and think on it.



Know All About Measuring ROI of Social Media

Whenever any conversation arises about social media marketing, companies always involve the ROI of such media and try to define ways to measure it. Businesses using social media view it as any other marketing tool and expect it to provide similar returns, not realizing that this is not a simple marketing tool. Before asking how to measure ROI of such marketing, it is important understand why you need to measure it and whether such reasons really warrant an in-depth analysis of ROI.

Traditionally, businesses used TV advertisements to promote their companies’ products or services. The impact of such marketing strategies was very easy to measure by measuring the change in sales during and after the advertisement period. Businesses feel that social media marketing works in a similar way and want to measure the ROI of such media in the same manner. Moreover, companies feel that as they have appointed a special person to look after social media marketing, there should be noticeable returns.

The problem with most businesses is with this basic assumption and comparison of social media marketing to traditional marketing. Social media marketing is a tool that is and should be used for effective communication with the community at large. When compared to a marketing tool, it can at the most be called a pre-sales strategy that involves chatting with the prospective customer with the hope of enticing the person to buy the product. It has been often associated with idle conversations and building relationships. Social media marketing is akin to the free trials of products that are given as part of traditional marketing, and also all types of technical support that is given before final sale. When defined in such terms, ROI of such media becomes very difficult to measure as it is very tricky to measure the ROI of conversations and relationships.

Secondly, it is important to note that such marketing is most useful in post-sale customer service, where companies use these tools to maintain and develop their customer base. If there is a customer who does not like a product, then companies employ such methods to ensure that the problem is solved. By helping such customers, you are building a loyal base, which in turn will virally ensure future growth in sales. This again proves how difficult it is to measure ROI of such media in actual terms. While customer service and pre-sales strategies definitely cost something and are a necessary investment, it is important to understand whether such measures can be calculated and whether such measures actually reflect their impact on businesses.

Finally, proponents of measuring ROI of this type of media feel that people only oppose it because they do not know how to measure it and hence feel that it is hard to calculate. This is not true as it has been proved that while ROI of such media is difficult to measure, it is not impossible. It is pertinent to note that some people feel that this method of measuring ROI of such media is short sighted and completely wrong and that there are other ways of measuring than in monetary terms. According to such people, while value of a conversation and relationship cannot be measured in monetary terms, it definitely has some importance, which may or may not be directly visible.

In a nutshell, you will need to measure ROI of social media to keep a tab on the results that it’s delivering, and fine-tune your strategy, as and when needed, to reap the optimum benefits.



Trying to Figure Your Social Media ROI

As a client attraction coach using social media and online marketing strategies, one of the biggest problems I see small business owners and entrepreneurs have is trying to measure their ROI… Return on Investment.

First: We have to understand that social media is a different type of marketing. It’s not the old traditional static style marketing that send sales messages to buy – buy – buy. Once the ad was printed, that was it for the duration of the time period the ad ran.

There wasn’t any connection or contact made with the person you were marketing to. Advertising companies controlled the marketing. Social media on the other hand is all done in real time and has leveled the playing field between the big guys with big advertising budgets and the little guys with little to no advertising budgets. For the first time, the consumer is in control.

Now your viewers want to talk with you, they want to interact and have conversations with you.

Social Media is all about people and taking the time to build relationships, it’s not about being salesy.

Second: People are not on social platforms looking for ways to spend money. They’re wanting to connect with likeminded people and people with like interests and to learn more about the things they want to spend money on. They aren’t there to actually buy.

Social Media ROI is not measured in Return on Investments, it’s measured more by Return on Impressions.

So how do you measure your Return on Impressions? By connecting and engaging in conversations with your viewers and:

  1. Building your online social media community consistently and persistently
  2. Your community in turn start talking about and promoting you to their communities
  3. Scheduling speaking engagements at live and online events and promote products or services
  4. You build your email list
  5. You’ve built brand recognition
  • These are just a few of the ways you can measure your Return on Impressions using social media. Again, it is not about sales, you’re building relationships which in turn leads to sales which in turn builds your business for traditional ROI.

Your Simple Action Step: Get the word out there and let your ideal clients know about you and what you do. Start searches on Facebook and your other social sites for your ideal clients and message them that you share a common interest (name the interest) and would like to connect with them. Careful though… on Facebook, do not send more than 25 personal friend requests a day or Facebook will shut you down for a few days.

Plus build your community, take the time to interact more on your social sites, it’s critical to your social media success. Post several times a day, using a post scheduler like Hootsuite (for posting across multiple sites) or the Facebook post scheduler (for Facebook business pages only). Ask questions, post pictures, use quotes, post blog posts, share other’s blog posts or information, and bring personal into your business page… it’s not all business.